Soil Association

An innovative prototype HQ Building

Project
Information

Location: Bristol

Client: The Soil Association

Status: Unbuilt

Designscape came second in a European wide competition for the new £20m headquarters for the Soil Association on the Harbourside site in Bristol. The design sought to put the building users first and create a healthy and respectful workplace which would reflect the core values of the charity: A work environment for ‘free range’ employees. The proposal demonstrated a holistic approach to environmental design by minimising energy usage, using low embodied energy materials and maximising the passive energy potential of the site. This was an opportunity to design a prototype office building fit for the future and the ideas generated are relevant to many situations. We look forward to putting these into practice in future projects.

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Seco Tools

New Headquarters

Project
Information

Location: Bourges, France

Client: Seco Tools AB

Status: Completed 2014

Key Materials: Aluminium Composite cladding, Larch cladding, Brise Soleil, curtain walling

Seco Tools are a tool manufacturer based in Sweden with more than 40 subsidiaries around the world. Designscape Architects were appointed as part of the Seco Tools Global real estate team, in conjunction with workplace specialists Wylde IA to design a replacement to the existing office administration block at the headquarters of Seco France. The existing building, built in the 1960’s was suffering numerous building failures to structure envelope and services. We designed the building to allow for phased demolition and development of the site whilst the existing offices were in occupation. Re-positioning the office accommodation next to the production space also provides an opportunity to better integrate departments, staff and company culture. Seco see the benefits of creating a positive flexible working environment for their staff and customers and have sought to reflect the company’s core values of open and friendly working, client commitment, dedication and expertise in their building facilities. Designscape’s design was developed by the in-country team and is currently under construction.

Designscape have also provided architectural advice; master planning, concept, through to construction design information for several other European sites including; Budapest Hungary and the HQ facility in Fagersta Sweden.

Designscape are an integral part of and foundation of our commercial projects as we look to modernise out global facilities. They understand our people and support development of the environments we need now and into the future.

Paul Hipkins, Global Project Manager, Seco Tools AB

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The Praedium

Spencer Back with Angus Meek Architects

Project
Information

Location: Bristol

Client: Crosby Homes

Status: Completed 2005

Designed for housing developer Crosby Homes, The Praedium includes 17 townhouses and 95 apartments arranged around common landscaped spaces and existing mature trees. The contemporary scheme occupies a brownfield site bordering two Conservation Areas. The townhouses, arranged in two terraces are of prefabricated timber frame construction. The apartments, clustered around 5 services cores are constructed within an in-situ, flat slab concrete frame and sit above a car park partially excavated beneath. While a Director at Angus Meek Architects, Spencer was responsible for the concept and planning design, tender and construction information provided through to completion.

'Highly Commended' at the National Home Builders Design Awards 2006.
Shortlisted for the RIBA Town & Country Design Awards 2007.

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Accordia

Chris Mackenzie with FCB Studios

Project
Information

Location: Cambridge

Client: Countryside Properties Ltd

Status: Completed 2008

Chris Mackenzie was part of the Feilden Clegg Bradley team that designed the Stirling prize winning “Accordia” housing project in Cambridge. FCB designed a radical master plan with Grant Associates (landscape) and included buildings by McCreanor Lavington and Alison Brooks Architects. Chris worked closely with the main contractor of the other practices in the team, coordinating the designs and delivering the first phase.

Highly Commended at the National Home Builders Design Awards 2006
Shortlisted for the RIBA Town & Country Design Awards 2007

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Avenue Housing

A back land development of 5 low cost homes

Project
Information

Location: Minehead

Client: Private

Status: Unbuilt

Key Materials: Render walls, Timber cladding, Fibre cement roof tiles, Zinc dormers

This development proposal responds to the need for small, low cost houses and flats in Minehead, whose economy is heavily dependent on seasonal work and retired people. Situated in the main street connecting the town centre to the beach, the scheme comprises the conversion of a Victorian former hotel and nursing home into seven private flats, some with private gardens, suitable for young or elderly couples. The former car park at the rear is to be developed as five small mews houses around a small parking yard, providing accommodation fitting for young families. The arrangement of shared facilities and common external circulation routes has been designed to encourage neighbours to meet and to get to know each other.

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Resource Recovery Park

A new waste to energy facility

Project
Information

Location: Park Grounds, Royal Wootton Bassett

Client: Crapper & Sons Landfill

Status: Under construction

Key Materials: Polycarbonate cladding, Concrete plinth, Engineered timber roof structure

The proposed Resource Recovery Park at Park Grounds, near Royal Wootton Bassett, has been designed to celebrate the process of creating energy from waste. The design creates a masterplan with key buildings focused on site movement and safety. Crapper & Sons Landfill Ltd. have been based on the site for nearly 35 years having contributed to the wider community through the Landfill community fund. This next step in the development of the business presents a positive step towards a significant reduction in landfill waste and an increase in recyclables. The waste handling building will produce energy through its combustion plant which feeds back into the grid. The translucent polycarbonate facade of the building in shades of green, allows high levels of daylight into the building to improve the internal working environment for employees, a high priority for the client. The timber roof structure has been design using parametric modelling and was selected over steel for reasons of cost and longevity.

Structural Engineer: Format Engineering

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Sun House

An experimental rural home

Project
Information

Location: Claverton Valley, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Completed

Key Materials: Oak cladding, Clay pantiles, COR-TEN steel, Insulated concrete formwork, Rainwater harvesting, Passive solar heating, PV solar panels, Polished concrete flooring, Bat cave

The house sits at the top of the Claverton Valley on the outskirts of Bath, and replaces a low-grade mobile home. The design is a response to the woodland setting and arranges accommodation into two distinct elements. The main volume is clad with rough-cut oak boarding and contains the entrance and kitchen on the ground floor and living room above. A second, single storey wing is faced with oxidised steel panels and contains sleeping areas that open directly into the garden. The grass roof of the bedroom wing provides a terrace to the adjacent first floor space. The house employs experimental construction and technology, incorporating rainwater harvesting, passive and active solar energy, and is virtually free from pvc materials.

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The Beacon

A contemporary House in the World Heritage City

Project
Information

Location: Bath

Client: Private

Status: Awaiting Planning Permission

Key Materials: Fibre cement and cedar cladding, Cotswold stone rubble walling, Triple glazed window system, Cantilever structure

This scheme replaces an unremarkable 1930s house on an exceptional site, at the top of a steep south facing, wooded site overlooking the City of Bath. The site is in a special and spectacular location and demands a bold and high-quality scheme to take advantage of the opportunities that it offers.

The proposed new house sits almost exactly on the footprint of the existing house so that the wooded site can be maintained with minimal impact. In the summer the living rooms and the extensive balcony cantilever out into the tree canopies. In the winter the trees still screen the views from the city below towards this sensitive site, but the trees become a veil through which the city lights below can be glimpsed.

A drystone wall plinth forms the base of the building, with lightweight framed elements cantilevering off this base and reaching out into the tree canopies, and towards the sun and the views. The context of the site is more wooded hillside than any nearby buildings, so the base of the building references the predominant local building material, translating it from the urban ashlar walling of the nearby terraces, into the more naturalistic rubble walling, and the dark grey fibre cement cladding, partly overclad with cedar battens to reference the woods – predominantly dark and shady, with vertical timber elements.

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Jetty House

An engineered timber Passive House

Project
Information

Location: Cotswolds Water Park

Client: The Sunday Times British Homes Awards 2014

Status: Competition entry submitted

Key Materials: Prefabricated timber frame, Timber cladding, MVHR system

The Jetty House is conceived as a place of refuge, a counterpoint to the busy urban world that most of us live in. A place for quiet and family life. The proposal offers the possibility of privacy and individual space but also of a sense of community within the groups of houses. The houses bring the occupants into direct contact with the natural world, and whilst providing a high degree of comfort and sustainable living, the design exploits the whole potential of sustainable living rather than simply to focus on low energy usage.The Jetty House is designed to perform to Passivhaus standards. Nonetheless the design allows for large areas of opening windows and woodburning stoves, enabling seemless integration and enjoyment of the rich context.

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Middle Stoke

A reflective cantilevered house

Project
Information

Location: Middle Stoke, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Under construction

Key Materials: Steel frame, Aluminium composite cladding, Cotswold stone, MVHR system, Green roof

This scheme proposes the replacement of a 1960s house overlooking the Avon Valley at Limpley Stoke. The site presents a number of challenges – the views out of the site are almost due North, making it quite difficult to get sunlight to penetrate the plan, and the Southern edge of the site – on which the existing house is sited – is an unstable slope.

The new house has to sit closer to the Northern boundary of the site, but views out over and down the Avon Valley are made possible by cantilevering the upper storey off a rubble stone base. The upper storey culminates in the master bedroom and bathroom which will have unparalleled views out over the landscape. The garden has been designed to slip over and under the house, with green roofs and covered terraces, embedding the building into the landscape.

The simple rectangular volume of the upper storey is clad in an aluminium cladding, which offers a slightly blurred refection of the surroundings, losing the edges and de-materialising the form of the upper storey.

Landscape design: B:D Landscape

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Project Information.

This scheme proposes the replacement of a 1960s house overlooking the Avon Valley at Limpley Stoke. The site presents a number of challenges – the views out of the site are almost due North, making it quite difficult to get sunlight to penetrate the plan, and the Southern edge of the site – on which the existing house is sited – is an unstable slope.

The new house has to sit closer to the Northern boundary of the site, but views out over and down the Avon Valley are made possible by cantilevering the upper storey off a rubble stone base. The upper storey culminates in the master bedroom and bathroom which will have unparalleled views out over the landscape. The garden has been designed to slip over and under the house, with green roofs and covered terraces, embedding the building into the landscape.

The simple rectangular volume of the upper storey is clad in an aluminium cladding, which offers a slightly blurred refection of the surroundings, losing the edges and de-materialising the form of the upper storey.

Landscape design: B:D Landscape