Avenue Housing

A back land development of 5 low cost homes

Project
Information

Location: Minehead

Client: Private

Status: Unbuilt

Key Materials: Render walls, Timber cladding, Fibre cement roof tiles, Zinc dormers

This development proposal responds to the need for small, low cost houses and flats in Minehead, whose economy is heavily dependent on seasonal work and retired people. Situated in the main street connecting the town centre to the beach, the scheme comprises the conversion of a Victorian former hotel and nursing home into seven private flats, some with private gardens, suitable for young or elderly couples. The former car park at the rear is to be developed as five small mews houses around a small parking yard, providing accommodation fitting for young families. The arrangement of shared facilities and common external circulation routes has been designed to encourage neighbours to meet and to get to know each other.

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Resource Recovery Park

A new waste to energy facility

Project
Information

Location: Park Grounds, Royal Wootton Bassett

Client: Crapper & Sons Landfill

Status: Under construction

Key Materials: Polycarbonate cladding, Concrete plinth, Engineered timber roof structure

The proposed Resource Recovery Park at Park Grounds, near Royal Wootton Bassett, has been designed to celebrate the process of creating energy from waste. The design creates a masterplan with key buildings focused on site movement and safety. Crapper & Sons Landfill Ltd. have been based on the site for nearly 35 years having contributed to the wider community through the Landfill community fund. This next step in the development of the business presents a positive step towards a significant reduction in landfill waste and an increase in recyclables. The waste handling building will produce energy through its combustion plant which feeds back into the grid. The translucent polycarbonate facade of the building in shades of green, allows high levels of daylight into the building to improve the internal working environment for employees, a high priority for the client. The timber roof structure has been design using parametric modelling and was selected over steel for reasons of cost and longevity.

Structural Engineer: Format Engineering

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Sun House

An experimental rural home

Project
Information

Location: Claverton Valley, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Completed

Key Materials: Oak cladding, Clay pantiles, COR-TEN steel, Insulated concrete formwork, Rainwater harvesting, Passive solar heating, PV solar panels, Polished concrete flooring, Bat cave

The house sits at the top of the Claverton Valley on the outskirts of Bath, and replaces a low-grade mobile home. The design is a response to the woodland setting and arranges accommodation into two distinct elements. The main volume is clad with rough-cut oak boarding and contains the entrance and kitchen on the ground floor and living room above. A second, single storey wing is faced with oxidised steel panels and contains sleeping areas that open directly into the garden. The grass roof of the bedroom wing provides a terrace to the adjacent first floor space. The house employs experimental construction and technology, incorporating rainwater harvesting, passive and active solar energy, and is virtually free from pvc materials.

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The Beacon

A contemporary House in the World Heritage City

Project
Information

Location: Bath

Client: Private

Status: Awaiting Planning Permission

Key Materials: Fibre cement and cedar cladding, Cotswold stone rubble walling, Triple glazed window system, Cantilever structure

This scheme replaces an unremarkable 1930s house on an exceptional site, at the top of a steep south facing, wooded site overlooking the City of Bath. The site is in a special and spectacular location and demands a bold and high-quality scheme to take advantage of the opportunities that it offers.

The proposed new house sits almost exactly on the footprint of the existing house so that the wooded site can be maintained with minimal impact. In the summer the living rooms and the extensive balcony cantilever out into the tree canopies. In the winter the trees still screen the views from the city below towards this sensitive site, but the trees become a veil through which the city lights below can be glimpsed.

A drystone wall plinth forms the base of the building, with lightweight framed elements cantilevering off this base and reaching out into the tree canopies, and towards the sun and the views. The context of the site is more wooded hillside than any nearby buildings, so the base of the building references the predominant local building material, translating it from the urban ashlar walling of the nearby terraces, into the more naturalistic rubble walling, and the dark grey fibre cement cladding, partly overclad with cedar battens to reference the woods – predominantly dark and shady, with vertical timber elements.

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Jetty House

An engineered timber Passive House

Project
Information

Location: Cotswolds Water Park

Client: The Sunday Times British Homes Awards 2014

Status: Competition entry submitted

Key Materials: Prefabricated timber frame, Timber cladding, MVHR system

The Jetty House is conceived as a place of refuge, a counterpoint to the busy urban world that most of us live in. A place for quiet and family life. The proposal offers the possibility of privacy and individual space but also of a sense of community within the groups of houses. The houses bring the occupants into direct contact with the natural world, and whilst providing a high degree of comfort and sustainable living, the design exploits the whole potential of sustainable living rather than simply to focus on low energy usage.The Jetty House is designed to perform to Passivhaus standards. Nonetheless the design allows for large areas of opening windows and woodburning stoves, enabling seemless integration and enjoyment of the rich context.

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Middle Stoke

A reflective cantilevered house

Project
Information

Location: Middle Stoke, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Under construction

Key Materials: Steel frame, Aluminium composite cladding, Cotswold stone, MVHR system, Green roof

This scheme proposes the replacement of a 1960s house overlooking the Avon Valley at Limpley Stoke. The site presents a number of challenges – the views out of the site are almost due North, making it quite difficult to get sunlight to penetrate the plan, and the Southern edge of the site – on which the existing house is sited – is an unstable slope.

The new house has to sit closer to the Northern boundary of the site, but views out over and down the Avon Valley are made possible by cantilevering the upper storey off a rubble stone base. The upper storey culminates in the master bedroom and bathroom which will have unparalleled views out over the landscape. The garden has been designed to slip over and under the house, with green roofs and covered terraces, embedding the building into the landscape.

The simple rectangular volume of the upper storey is clad in an aluminium cladding, which offers a slightly blurred refection of the surroundings, losing the edges and de-materialising the form of the upper storey.

Landscape design: B:D Landscape

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Neros Foundation

Indonesian Health Clinic

Project
Information

Location: Flores, Indonesia

Client: The Neros Foundation

Status: Completed

Key Materials: Compressed earth, Bamboo, Concrete, Corrugated steel, Timber

We are proud to support the Neros Foundation through our links to one of the trustees, Cara Sykes. The Neros Foundation is a charity working to relieve poverty affecting the inhabitants of the island of Flores, Indonesia, by providing basic yet vital infrastructure. It was set up after the trustees realised how much impact relatively small amounts of money could have in Flores. The practice has given financial assistance enabling the charity to build toilet facilities for schools but more recently we offered an internship to architectural student, Sophie Greene to develop a sustainable design solution for a new medical outreach centre to serve the local population. Both Sophie and architectural assistant Kelia Espinosa travelled to Indonesia in the summer of 2012 to view and assist progress on site.

We produced a report on sustainable construction.

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Greenways

A modern single storey house

Project
Information

Location: Combe Down, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Completed 2018

Key Materials: Split face linear concrete blocks, green roof, charred timber, cedar wood shading.

Greenways is a new single storey house, sited in the large rear garden of an early C20th house in Combe Down, Bath. The four bedroom family house is organised in two wings. These are arranged to create a semi enclosed courtyard to the front of the house and south facing garden to the rear.

Entering the house, one first arrives at spaces associated with the life of the family, living, cooking and dining. These open directly onto the rear garden, clearly visible through a full height glazed wall of sliding doors. The more private bedroom wing is accessed from the centre of the house, via a top lit corridor. Bedroom windows face south into the garden. These are protected from excessive solar gain by a pergola running the length of the house. The house features a ‘green’ flat roof as though lifted from the original lawn. Split face masonry walls echo the mining activities which previously took place below the site.

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Crowe Lane

An innovative house framed of CNC machined timber

Project
Information

Location: Bath

Client: Private

Status: Planning permission obtained

Key Materials: Laminated veneer lumber, Reciprocal timber frame, Green roof.

The existing bungalow is a very quirky “wriggly tin” building, almost a shack, built around two stone chimneys. The site is also very unusual, being landlocked between neighbours’ gardens with the only access possible via a 1.2m wide footpath. But the site benefits from an open rural outlook with long views down the valley. So the design proposal was driven by the constraints of site and has evolved as a partially prefabricated plywood structure supported on a few masonry elements. It is conceived as a freeform structure providing the shelter required for living in the garden. The architecture is very “un – housy”. All of the components can be carried by hand onto the site and erected by hand. Excavation and material moving is kept to a minimum. The design process involved the extensive use of parametric modelling, with the main structural components then being cut using digital fabrication methods. The result is an undulating roof of plywood cassettes floating like a tree canopy over a series of freeform living spaces, and also includes an upper level and rooftop deck like a treehouse in the garden.

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Hillcrest

A new community of six houses

Project
Information

Location: Bristol

Client: ACH Developments

Status: Planning consent 2015, currently on site 2019

Key Materials:

Pennant Stone, Cedar Cladding, Clay tiles, Aluminium glazed sliding door system

A new community in a woodland setting.

This project for six new houses is located upon a hill north of Bristol within the village of Winterbourne Down. The wooded site previously formed the garden of a large derelict house and contained a disused quarry. The houses are arranged around a central ‘clearing’. Constructed with rubble stone and timber clad walls the houses are designed to reflect the character of the site and nearby listed church. The houses are positioned around protected trees and to maximise views from the elevated site. Four of the houses are substantial homes with 5 or more bedrooms and double garages. One has an outdoor swimming pool. The two remaining are designated affordable homes.

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Project Information.

A new community in a woodland setting.

This project for six new houses is located upon a hill north of Bristol within the village of Winterbourne Down. The wooded site previously formed the garden of a large derelict house and contained a disused quarry. The houses are arranged around a central ‘clearing’. Constructed with rubble stone and timber clad walls the houses are designed to reflect the character of the site and nearby listed church. The houses are positioned around protected trees and to maximise views from the elevated site. Four of the houses are substantial homes with 5 or more bedrooms and double garages. One has an outdoor swimming pool. The two remaining are designated affordable homes.