London Road Regeneration

A community led public realm improvement

Project
Information

Location: Bath

Client: Bath and Northeast Somerset

Status: Completed

Key Materials: Steel planters, Concrete paviors, Steel tree grilles, Public art

Before we started this project, London Road, a main thoroughfare in and out of Bath was blighted by heavy traffic and vacant commercial premises. We were appointed by Bath and North East Somerset to undertake a community led project to improve the external environment for local residents and business. By means of stakeholder workshops and use of models which encouraged participants to contribute their ideas in a variety of ways, a proposal to reclaim the street was developed and we produced a concept design which formed the basis for extensive traffic calming measures and public realm improvements. The final, constructed design was completed by others. The project has resulted in a more accessible environment, complete with trees, planters and improved pavement finishes that together create a higher quality gateway to the city.

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Green Park Station

A new public space

Project
Information

Location: Bath

Client: The Ethical Property Company

Status: Unbuilt

Key Materials: Cast iron, Timber, Glass

Key Features: Retail, Hospitality, Performance facilities

Green Park Station is a Grade II listed building which was redeveloped as a retail and events space in the mid 1980s after its closure as a railway terminus in 1971. We were appointed following an invited competition to propose ways of revitalising the station as a major public space. Our work to date has involved the extensive consultation with a variety of interested parties, including the Farmer’s Market and other traders, Sainsbury’s Supermarket (who operate the adjacent supermarket) and the Bath Cultural Forum. Ideas from these discussions have been translated into a proposal that would provide the city with a vibrate, accessible and commercially viable public venue in the spirit of Covent Garden Market in London.

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Court Farm Barn

A Listed Barn Conversion

Project
Information

Location: Langridge, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Completed

Key Materials: Steel support structure, Oak shutters and doors, Biomass heating system

Situated adjacent to the Farm House, the Grade II* listed former threshing barn had fallen into a state of disrepair and the proposal was developed to repair and convert the structure to provide ancillary accommodation to the main house, to include a home-work space, kitchen, bathroom and guest bedrooms. The new functions are contained within a series of free standing white timber boxes to the west end, leaving two- thirds of the original double-height volume intact. The existing modern steel frame is utilized to support the new roof structure without distributing the extra load onto the historic walls. As part of the first phase of works, a new wood-burning boiler in an adjacent outbuilding provides heating and hot water to both the farm house and converted barn.

We are very pleased with the finished results. The Farm and the Barn presented a number of challenges due to the building’s listed status and subsequent protracted negotiations with the local planning authority. Listed status restricted our options for conversion, but Designscape’s strategic approach was invaluable in clarifying our options. This included prioritising a green heating system which now serves not only the barn but also the rest of the farm. When the listed building officer brokered advice that the Barn could potentially fall into disrepair and become the responsibility of the local authority, this led to a practical agreement about a sympathetic design and flexible arrangement to proceed with planning.

The capacity of the architect, engineers and the builder to solve unexpected problems throughout the build process was also an important factor in the success of this project. This included the various challenges of stabilising the walls, the construction of the roof, the provision of new steel and the method of construction using internal scaffolding, and also the procurement and fitting of the entrance glazing to achieve very neat fixings etc.

The building has been brought back into use again and now also fulfils a role in the local community. The renovation has been very well received by neighbours including the church congregation who gather annually in it for Harvest Festival auction, Christmas and other events throughout the year. Even the construction process pragmatically involved the farming neighbour's labour and machinery to very good effect. The flexible use of the barn also includes family gatherings and an occasional wedding reception.

It is a wonderful space and Designscape have managed not only to provide flexible accommodation within but also to preserve the original character and qualities of a barn

The Client

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Neros Foundation

Indonesian Health Clinic

Project
Information

Location: Flores, Indonesia

Client: The Neros Foundation

Status: Completed

Key Materials: Compressed earth, Bamboo, Concrete, Corrugated steel, Timber

We are proud to support the Neros Foundation through our links to one of the trustees, Cara Sykes. The Neros Foundation is a charity working to relieve poverty affecting the inhabitants of the island of Flores, Indonesia, by providing basic yet vital infrastructure. It was set up after the trustees realised how much impact relatively small amounts of money could have in Flores. The practice has given financial assistance enabling the charity to build toilet facilities for schools but more recently we offered an internship to architectural student, Sophie Greene to develop a sustainable design solution for a new medical outreach centre to serve the local population. Both Sophie and architectural assistant Kelia Espinosa travelled to Indonesia in the summer of 2012 to view and assist progress on site.

We produced a report on sustainable construction.

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Corinium Museum

New facilities within a Listed Building

Project
Information

Location: Cirencester

Client: Corinium Museum

Status: Under construction

Key Materials: Velcromat, Oak, Glass

HLF Stage 3 (Delivery) funding has been awarded for the ‘Stone Age to Corinium’ project at the Corinium Museum, Cirencester. This project includes the creation of new Early Age galleries to display exciting new discoveries alongside significant existing artefacts from the area covering the period from Stone-Age to Early Roman times. It also includes the creation of a new Reception Foyer, refurbished gift shop, garden and new Discovery Centre. The project involves alteration works to a Grade II listed building. Detail design is progressing and works on site are due to commence later this year.

Exhibition design by Underwood & Co.

This project has been a long time in the planning so we’re delighted that the National Lottery has given us this support. This project will transform the front part of the Museum, creating a warm welcome for visitors and stunning new galleries which highlight the star objects from the prehistoric Cotswolds. The Discovery Centre will be an inspirational learning space for a diverse range of activities to be enjoyed by all our visitors

Amanda Hart, Museum Director

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Twinneys

A new sustainable home in the Greenbelt

Project
Information

Location: Charlcombe, Bath

Client: Private

Status: Completed 2009

Key Materials:

Douglas Fir, Fair Faced Concrete, Cotswold Stone, Green Roof, Zinc Roof

This award winning new house is built on the site of a former piggery and lies within the Bath & Bristol Green Belt in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The design is conceived as a low-lying timber and glass structure supported on a terraced landscape, to blur the boundary between building and terrain. Sleeping accommodation is situated on the lower ground floor of the house with the entrance and open-plan kitchen, dining and lounge spaces above. Three terraces open out from the living areas affording panoramic views across the valley. The thermal mass and high performance of the building envelope is complemented by solar hot water panels to provide a low energy solution. A partially autonomous artist’s studio and gallery is built into the hillside to the rear.

An outstanding piece of architecture has been derived from the combination of a perceptive and pragmatic response to a clients brief on a site heavily constrained by topography, geology and local planning requirements. Apparently seamless, cascading down the hill side taking full advantage of green roof technology, melding into the surrounding topography rather than dominating. Attention to every detail in tandem with the palette of natural materials used have resulted in a modern piece of architecture that is nestled in a very natural terrain.On a site rich in personal memory that remains a significant and unspoiled part of the rural surroundings of the historic city of Bath.

RIBA Town and Country Awards 2011 Jury Report

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Science Studios

Art gallery, production and storage building

Project
Information

Location: Stroud, Gloucestershire

Client: Damien Hirst

Status: Completed 2012

Key Materials: White glazed brick, in-situ concrete, Fire proof insulated metal cladding

Designscape has developed a 9,000sqm art production studio and gallery for Damien Hirst. The project reuses an existing steel portal frame structure originally built for the manufacture of plastics. The brief involved a high level of design, detail and finish, including exceptionally high structural loading requirements and innovative cladding and glazing. The building is split into three bays: reception and gallery, art production and storage facilities, with each area defined externally through cladding panels of contrasting colours. The artist’s production of large-scale art work requires highly specialised accommodation, including freezer storage and a fire protected art store. The western riverside boundary has become a sculpture garden.

In addition to the principal Science gallery and production space, a smaller independent formaldehyde studio has been built. The formaldehyde studio requires unique accommodation and dedicated services, including specialist ventilation equipment to filter out the formaldehyde fumes. As well as large-scale freezer storage, specialist cranage equipment has been incorporated for handling large and delicate art works. The steel frame structure is clad with white glazed bricks and small mortar joints to create a sculptural monolithic appearance.

In association with MRJ Rundell + Associates

The technical virtuosity of the brickwork was “spectacular” said one of the judges. With such a specific design applied to the specialised bricks, this building had to be “meticulously detailed”. Even the joints which are 4mm, provide an impressive alteration in scale. The judges appreciated the skill required to produce a skin of white glazed bricks which is notoriously difficult to achieve and thoroughly enjoyed the attention to detail displayed throughout the project.

Judges Brick Awards 2012

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Project Information.

Designscape has developed a 9,000sqm art production studio and gallery for Damien Hirst. The project reuses an existing steel portal frame structure originally built for the manufacture of plastics. The brief involved a high level of design, detail and finish, including exceptionally high structural loading requirements and innovative cladding and glazing. The building is split into three bays: reception and gallery, art production and storage facilities, with each area defined externally through cladding panels of contrasting colours. The artist’s production of large-scale art work requires highly specialised accommodation, including freezer storage and a fire protected art store. The western riverside boundary has become a sculpture garden.

In addition to the principal Science gallery and production space, a smaller independent formaldehyde studio has been built. The formaldehyde studio requires unique accommodation and dedicated services, including specialist ventilation equipment to filter out the formaldehyde fumes. As well as large-scale freezer storage, specialist cranage equipment has been incorporated for handling large and delicate art works. The steel frame structure is clad with white glazed bricks and small mortar joints to create a sculptural monolithic appearance.

In association with MRJ Rundell + Associates